0330 058 1850

Varicose veins from pelvic varicose veins – PCS

by – October 6, 2020

Recurrent varicose veins on backs of thighs – no improvement after endovenous laser done elsewhere

Recurrent varicose veins on backs of thighs – no improvement after endovenous laser done elsewhere

This patient came to The Whiteley Clinic this week. She had previously gone to another vein clinic to have treatment of her varicose veins.

The doctor had done his own scan – always a worrying sign. He had only checked the 2 main veins These are the Great and Small Saphenous Veins. (Before 2001 they were called the “Long” and “Short” Saphenous Veins).

However, doctors doing their own scans rarely have time to check for other causes of varicose veins such as perforator veins or pelvic veins.

So, this patient was recommended endovenous laser ablation (EVLA).

Knowing no better, she consented and had the EVLA treatment.

After the operation, there was no improvement in the veins. So the doctor then did some sclerotherapy. Although this made a small improvement in the short term, the veins soon reappeared.

Varicose veins from pelvic varicose veins

Fortunately, the patient found The Whiteley Clinic on the internet.

She asked for an appointment. As with all our patients, we followed The Whiteley Protocol.

Typical distribution of varicose veins arising from pelvic varicose veins PCS

Typical distribution of varicose veins arising from pelvic varicose veins PCS

The patient was booked for a consultation with one of our Whiteley Clinic trained consultants and a scan with a Whiteley Clinic trained vascular technologist.

At the consultation, it was obvious that she had the diagonal veins across the backs of her thighs that indicate that the problem is probably arising in her pelvic veins.

Moreover, she also had the tell-tale veins coming from the pelvis in the left leg – although these were not visible on the right.

This indicated the most probable reason her veins had not got better. Her previous surgeon had not diagnosed her pelvic varicose veins!

On careful questioning, she had also had a “heaviness” in her pelvis on occasions. When she saw a gynaecologist, she was told that there was nothing wrong!

The combination of varicose veins arising from the pelvis, and dragging pains in the pelvis, make the diagnosis of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome (PCS) very likely.

Missed perforator veins

Tell-tale varicose vein arising from pelvis and emerging by vulva or perineum on inner thigh PCS

Tell-tale varicose vein arising from pelvis and emerging by vulva or perineum on inner thigh – PCS

When the patient had the duplex scan by The Whiteley Clinic vascular technologist, they found that not only had the pelvic varicose veins been missed, but there were several incompetent perforator veins that had also been missed.

Reducing the risks of recurrent varicose veins

Although everyone likes a bargain, when it comes to medical practice you really do get what you pay for!

This patient had previously paid for diagnosis and treatment of her varicose veins, but now has to start all over again. The previous treatment had failed to treat the underlying causes.

For more information about Pelvic Varicose Veins please see the book “Pelvic Congestion Syndrome – Chronic Pelvic Pain and Pelvic Venous Disorders”.

For more information about perforating veins, please see the book “Understanding Venous Reflux – The Cause of Varicose Veins and Venous Leg Ulcers”.

To book an appointment to see one of our venous consultants, please contact us.

The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your doctor or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Always seek the advice of a doctor or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site and the information provided is not a substitute for medical advice.