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Varicose veins of Vagina and Vulva

by – September 1, 2014

Prof Mark Whiteley was quoted in The Telegraph discussing varicose veins of vagina and vulva. Research from The Whiteley Clinic has shown that 1 in 7 women have varicose veins of vagina and vulva. However many are not obvious until either pregnancy or until leg varicose veins keep recurring despite surgery or other treatment.

Prof Mark S Whiteley quoted in The Telegraph about varicose veins of vagina and vulva.

Prof Mark S Whiteley quoted in The Telegraph about varicose veins of the vagina and vulva.

Varicose veins of vagina and vulva:

About 15-20% of people have varicose veins of their legs that they can see. Another 15-20% of people have “hidden varicose veins”. These are varicose veins that are too deep under the skin to be seen from the surface. However, despite lying deeper, they can still cause problems such as aching, ankle swelling, eczema, skin damage, phlebitis and ulcers. With new the endovenous techniques used in The Whiteley Protocol®, leg varicose veins can be treated successfully under local anaesthetic with walk-in walk-out surgery.

However for women suffering from varicose veins of vagina and vulva, help is harder to find. Firstly many women suffering from varicose veins of vagina and vulva find it hard to talk to others about their condition. Secondly, many non-specialist doctors, nurses and mid-wives do not know that there are treatments available to investigate and treat the pelvic varicose veins that cause this problem.

The Whiteley Clinic has been at the forefront of the research into the investigation and treatment of pelvic varicose veins that lead to varicose veins of vagina and vulva since the year 2000. Using the techniques developed at The Whiteley Clinic, all women with varicose veins of vagina and vulva can have the optimal investigations and treatment.

A transvaginal duplex ultrasound performed by a specialist vascular technologist trained at The Whiteley Clinic identifies which pelvic veins are causing the problem. MRI, MRV, CT scanning and Venography have all been shown to be sub-optimal compared to transvaginal duplex ultrasound.

Once found, a combination of pelvic vein embolisation with coils and foam sclerotherapy has been shown by The Whiteley Clinic research to give excellent results in the majority of patients.

To see the article in full, see:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-health/11063825/Half-of-young-women-cant-locate-their-vaginas.html

 

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